Tag Archives: weekend

Weekend again!

4 Aug

It’s finally Friday again. Although I was only working for 3 days this week, it felt like 4 weeks. So I am definitely ready for the weekend.

Last weekend I was in London and I did something that I had never thought about doing. I visiting the Game and Country Fair at Hatfield House. This had never been on my list of things to do but it was something on my other half’s list so I was happy to go along.

I am not sure what I was expecting but I thoroughly enjoyed the day. I have never seen so much tweed and Barbour jackets in one place at one time. I was beginning to think that it was a Guinness World Record attempt for “The Most Tweed in One Field” but it wasn’t.

I was also surprised how many gun manufacturing companies were exhibiting at the fair. I wasn’t really aware how popular shooting was in England. It is popular here in Switzerland but a lot of people have guns anyway because of the military service that young people have to complete. There were custom-made guns as well as antique guns. It was unique to see how the guns are traditionally made: starting with a block of wood and slowly chiseling it out into a recognisable gun-shape.

Of course, if there are gun there, you have to have a go right? So we did. There was a clay pigeon shooting activity. I was at a distinct disadvantage as my other half is a member of a Swiss gun club and I was not going to be tempted into a bet with him. It was actually pretty easy to get the hang of and we had a trainer who explained to us exactly what to do and how to improve our shooting. Unfortunately, it was all over too quickly, especially as we had waited in line for an age.

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There was also archery to try which, of course, we did. Rather than shooting at a target. We had a plastic deer to aim at. It was something a bit different. I have no idea how Katniss Everdeen from Hunger Games manages to hunt with a bow and arrow. It was hard to shoot a stationary target, never mind a target that is moving.

The archery sessions were run by a club who had come from Stratford in Warwickshire. They must have made a killing (no pun intended) on the sessions because they were only using their own time and had no other overheads as they already had the equipment. There were lots of people lining up to have a go. Might be a good business idea for the future.

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The rest of the weekend we met up with some friends of mine from university, who I last saw about 3 years ago when they were over in Switzerland on a trip. It’s nice to meet up with friends and just carry on from where you left off last time as if no time had passed since you last saw each other.

The rest of the weekend was nice and relaxing with a bit of shopping, a quick trip to the National Portrait Gallery and some nice food in China Town.

I have a feeling that this weekend will be relaxing but in a different way!

A Grand (National) Day Out

10 Apr

For the weekend, I popped home for the weekend to watch The Grand National. The most famous steeplechase in the world is possibly the only event that I have placed a bet on in my life. I am discounting the times when we have gone to the races or even the greyhound races as a family and have done our own “in-house” betting; in which we each put a pound in and the winner gets to keep the money in the pot.

Going to the races live was not a opportunity that I was going to miss. I sorted out an outfit with a dress and hat that I already had. I decided to buy a new pair of shoes (without a heel) so that I would be able to comfortably walk around and enjoy the day without the agony and worry about staying in hills all day. More on this later…

thumbnail_IMG_5123On the day of the race, the weather was glorious and that is not an understatement. There was not a cloud in the sky and the sun was out in style. The metaphorical cloud on the horizon was the fact that several rail companies in the north west were striking on the final day of the National – the day that we had tickets for. Luckily, there were still trains from Liverpool Central to Aintree at the time of the day when we needed it. No other trains were running at all. It was quite funny to see the train schedules on the screens in the train station and all of the trains going to Aintree and nowhere else.

We arrived in good spirits and soaked up the atmosphere while we waited for the racing to begin. There is a walking tour of the actual race course that you can do before the races start but my new shoes were already being to rub and hurt me like crazy so I gave that one a miss. It was also possible to see where Red Rum, the most famous horse to ever run in the National, was buried near the Finishing Post.

I didn’t bet on the first race because I was a bit indecisive and I realised that the races aren’t as exciting when you know that you will not benefit financially from one of the horses crossing the line first. For the second race, I put a fiver on Finian’s Oscar to win. I chose the horse because it reminded me of Finigan’s Wake, the novel by James Joyce. The luck of the Irish was on my side because I won 18 pound, 75 pence when the horse crossed the line first. And it was much more exciting to watch as the race enfolded.

I won another 6 pound on the next race and then I guess my luck ran out because I didn’t win a penny after that. It was still exciting though. The atmosphere when The Grand National finally got underway was thrilling. After two false starts and a lot of groaning and disgruntled spectators, the crowd erupted in excitement. It is always difficult to work out which horses have fallen, who is still in the race and if there is still some chance of financial gain at the end of it. But without the benefit of the TV and the list of the horses who have fallen popping up on the screen, it is virtually impossible. No surprise that there was no final win for me.

Meanwhile my feet were painful and blistered. I had managed to cope in the knowledge that I would just need to get the train, then the bus and I would be able to the shoes off and put my trainers on. Luckily I didn’t have to wait that long as there were people handing out flip-flops to ladies, like me who had worn unsuitable shoes for the day. The best thing was they were free! I would have paid a lot of money for those flip-flops if they had made me. The relief was instant and I was a lot more comfortable on the way home.

On the Sunday, I caught the train and headed timage1o Manchester, where I met my brother and his kids and we drove to my mum’s house. I was treated to a lovely, and unexpected Sunday Roast, and we went for a walk to feed the ducks. On the way back, we managed to see some lambs who had been born only a few hours before.
All to soon, as it always seems to be, it was Monday morning and I was back at the airport again, queuing to have my bag scanned and waiting for the plane to be ready to head back to Switzerland and back to work…

A Norwegian Getaway

2 Apr

After having the first BBQ of the season on Thursday evening, I was ready for holidaying to start. On the Friday, I jetted off early to Oslo in the hope that the weather forecasts were completely wrong. Up above the clouds and seeing the sun, I was thinking that the weather was going to be a lot better than predicted. My hopes were shattered when we descended under the clouds and I could see a coating of snow on the ground! I was glad my gut instinct of bring layers and hat and gloves had been correct.

The train from the airport to the City centre was quick and I had arrived by 10am. Although there was no snow in the city, it was foggy and grey but at least not the rain that was forecast. As the weather was not great and I had bought the Oslo Pass which includes entrance into 30 museums, I decided to be a culture vulture.

After a wander round to get my bearings, the first stop was the Nobel Peace Centre. Last year I went to the Nobel Centre in Stockholm, Sweden so I thought it would be nice to see the exhibition about the Peace Prize. The museum itself was quite small and, in my opinion, not as good as the museum in Stockholm. The main display was an exhibition of all the winners of the prize on iPads. When you walk up past the iPads, it activates the screens and gives more information about the prize winner. It took me a while to realise that when a screen is activated a musical note plays, so that when there are more people in the room looking at parts of the installation it produces a, well, for want of a better word, a peaceful atmosphere.

I moved next to the Munch museum (which is apparently is pronounced “Monk”). I was expecting to see The Scream, which seems like a reasonable assumption but it wasn’t there. In fact, the museum doesn’t have a permanent exhibition. The paintings are changed regularly so it could happened that it’s hit or miss what you see. I personally wasn’t a fan of what I saw.

The Natural History Museum was the next stop and I came face to face with a T-rex. I had no idea that the museum had a T-rex so it was a nice surprise. I always found Natural History Museums a bit macabre as a child and I guess I still do. But the stuff about dinosaurs and fossils are pretty cool.

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I had already booked a Fjord cruise but by the time I left the museums, it was rain. The weather forecast was right. It was bucketing it down. The boat had no sides and the only roof was a canvas. Luckily there were blankets provided but it didn’t do too much to keep me warm. My idea of what a cruise on the Fjords would be like was not what I expected. Because of the foggy and the mist, there wasn’t anything to see. It was just grey. The only way I can describe it is that if Manchester was on the sea and they put on cruises it would be exactly like that: Raining, cold and grey. I can imagine that in the summer when you can see all the islands with their greenery, with the sun beating down that it has a certain majesty about it. By the time, I disembarked I wasn’t able to feel my feet. I was glad to go for something to eat to warm up.

The weather on Saturday was unfortunately much the same. So, it was time for more museums. On the Fjord cruise an American family had told me that they had been to the Fram museum and highly recommended it. I headed there first. The Fram museum houses the Fram, a boat that was used in Polar exploration. There was lots of information about the race to get to the North Pole between Scott and Amundsen, who was Norwegian. It was even possible to board the Fram and go into all the cabins and see how the ships worked. I have no idea how it must have been to go into the unchartered territory with limited provisions, nevermind having to cope with the cold all those years ago without the technology that we have today.

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Next to the Fram museum are also the National Maritime Museum and the Kon-tiki Museum. I’m not all that interested in martime history and I only really went because it was free. I am sure that it would be really interesting if boats through the ages was your thing. The Kon-tiki musuem was dedicated to the work of Thor Heyerdahl who in 1947 made an expedition from South America to French Polynesia because he wanted to prove that the people of Polynesia had a link to Peruvians. To prove it, he took 5 other friends on a raft, called Kon-tiki made out of wood across 4,000 miles of ocean. The original vessel that they sailed on was in the museum. It’s an incredible story – not least when Heyerdahl not only had a fear of water and wasn’t able to swim. One of his most famous quotes is: “Borders? I have never seen one, but I have heard they exist in the minds of some people” Perhaps if more people had this view of life that there would be less conflict in the world.

Next I headed to The National Gallery because, after a bit of research, I had found out that this was where The Scream was kept. It’s quite bizarre that it is just housed in a normal room with no additional security when it had been stolen about 3 times in the past. It was a surprise just to come across it in one of the side rooms. I only realised it must be there because so many people were sitting looking at it.

After a small stop for lunch, I went to the Ibsen museum. I had heard of Ibsen before and I could name a few of his works but after visiting the museum, which is on the site of where he last lived, I will make a conserted effort to read some of the things he has written. It seems like a man who was ahead of his time, writing about women’s role in society, for example. Some of the details of his private life are not so pleasant but that doesn’t stop his plays from being good.

There was just enough time to look around the Akershus Castle and to go to the Opera House where I was treated to an incredible sunset over the city (by now, the weather was improving and I even saw some blue sky). It is possible to climb up to the roof of the Opera House and the view from the top is something to behold.

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Overall, I really enjoyed my time in Norway. The weather was the major disappointment. It meant the weekend was more of a damp than I was hoping but I made the most of it.

Next weekend I am back in the UK to go to the Grand National for the first time. The weather can’t be as bad as the weekend in Norway, can it?

 

Another Sunday evening…

19 Feb

Why is it that the weeks drag and the weekends go too fast? It is Sunday evening already and soon I will preparing my lunch for tomorrow and getting my bag packed for Monday morning and the 6am wake up call. I sort of feel like the weekend has been a bit of a waste. I don’t really feel like I have done anything, although that is not strictly true.

On Friday evening, I went to see Mary Poppins the musical. I think it is the first time that I have been to see a musical in around two decades. To begin with I was a little bit disappointed because the plot of the musical is not like the film at all. Obviously, I understand that there are somethings that you just can’t do on stage that you can do with a film that is ended and not performed live but fundamental part of the story were changed.

For example, Mrs Bank is not a suffragette fightinhgfor women to get the vote; she is instead a woman who is chastised by her husband because she is basically good for nothing. I am not sure that P. L. Travers would approve about this change to the character.

However, the performance was fantastic. The hairs literally stood up on my neck when the first song began. The set and scenery was inspired. The cast were so talented. Not only did they have to sing, dance and act but they also tap danced. I mean, who learns to tap dance these days? It seems like a bit of an antiquated craft that doesn’t have a lot of use in the 21st century unless you happen to be appearing in a West End musical.

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As I left the theatre I wondered if my life had gone astray a bit. Here I was completely entertained by complete strangers, completely in awe of their talents and the woman who played Mary Poppins was so “practically perfect in every way” that I thought I was watching Julie Andrews in the original film. I have a new heroine to look up to. It made me wonder how people can end up in jobs where they spread so much joy and I spend most of the week looking at spreadsheets and adding up numbers. I don’t ever remember “Star of a West End musical” being a career’s option at school when we had career days and I am not sure that would have interested me back then anyway. But hindsight is wonderful thing.

Everyone has different talents though. The cast might be able to tap dance but can they do a vlookup or a Sumifs formula in Excel? Possibly not. Possibly they wouldn’t be interesting in learning something like that anyway.

I wonder if the cast of these productions ever feel the way we feel about going back to our everyday jobs on a Monday. Perhaps Mary is sitting in her dressing room now thinking “Oh my god, I have to sing A Spoonful of-bloody-Sugar AGAIN today. It’s the tenth time this week”. I guess we all get stuck into a routine at some point and think that the grass is greener on the other side.

Although it would be amazing to have to find my umbrella that makes me fly on a Sunday night for the next day, I will stick to finding my badge to getting me in the revolving doors at the office. For now…

 

 

Disaster and two murders in a weekend!

5 Feb

Disaster might be a bit of a strong word but bad things have happened this weekend. The Wifi modem has broken and since Thursday evening there has been no internet connection at home.

I am not the sort of person who can’t go without the internet. In fact, not having the Internet  when I travel is one of the reasons that I like to travel so much. I normally only have the internet when I am at a hotel or restaurant and I can get a connection. I never pay for data roaming; partly because I don’t want to age 10 years when I finally get the bill and I realise how much data I have actually downloaded. I find pleasure in not being 100% contactable during time away and also not worrying why someone hasn’t replied to one of my messages.

It was a bit annoying that it had to happen this weekend. I had nothing planned this weekend, except a two phone calls via FaceTime with a friend and with my mum but now with no Wifi and a weak signal on my phone, that is not possible. I was looking forward as well.

fax-1904656__340Also, I had planned to spend some time this weekend on the internet researching some thing to do on my holiday in April. The weather is so cold and grey that a bit of research and thinking about holiday in a few months time was going to be momentary release from the drudgery of February. It seems like it was not to be.

Instead I have managed to do quite bit of reading. I have finally finished the second ever German book I have read. I am feeling a little smug again. This book was harder to read than The Reader because there isn’t a film that the book is based on that I have already seen. The book was a sort of crime thriller. A man is found dead and a private detective is hired to find out what happened. The book is called Happy Birthday, Türke by Jakob Arjouni, if you are interested. I also finished an English book that I only started on Wednesday evening. Because the Wifi broke on Thursday and the TV was also not working so well, I managed to get through a lot of it before the weekend even started. Coincidently, this book was also about a private detective. And, thinking about it, the book does start with the death of a man at the beginning. They weren’t the same book though. I am pretty sure that my German is not so bad that I wouldn’t have noticed.

If you are wondering how I am writing this without Internet, I am actually writing it on my phone. It isn’t the same as typing on the computer. I have fat figure syndrome and I keep hitting the wrong keys on my phone. It is taking me a lot longer than it would do normally. It’s frustrating. But hopefully a new modem will arrive tomorrow and normal service will be resumed. If not, I did visit a book shop yesterday with the intention of “just having a look”, but I came out of the shop ten minutes later with a bagful of books, so I should be able to keep myself entertained for a few days more at least.

Short breaks at home

24 Jan

This weekend I went home for a very short break for the first time this year. Over time I have managed to categorise time back home into quick weekends, long weekends and a week or so.

This weekend I added a new category to the list: very short weekend. I arrived on Friday evening and flew back on Sunday afternoon. It works out as less than 48 hours. Luckily, the flight out was on time and actually landed in Manchester early.*

A trip back home normally means having to attend to some admin, shopping for a few things I can’t get in Switzerland or things that are really expensive there and spending time with friends and family. Unfortunately, with the weekend being so short, there was only time to see immediate family. I had a very quick one hour with my grandparents, who it is always lovely to see. The main purpose of the visit this weekend was to meet my nephew for the first time. On this front, the visit did not disappoint. It was worth the wait to see such a happy boy, who also has a big smile on his face.

I don’t know what my niece understands of me not being there all the time. She obviously recognises me from video calls and photos but she is too young to understand that I live in another country far away from the UK. She even asked me this time, why I didn’t live here. It’s a bit complex to explain to a 3-year-old.

I bet she wonders what all the fuss is about whenever I come home and why she has to spend time with this person that she doesn’t even really know. I hope when she is older both she and my nephew will understand some of my reasons for living and working in another country. In the meantime, I will accept that they mainly like me because I can’t resist bringing presents wherever I come back home and I am easily persuaded to play games with them and their imaginary friends.

There are definitely more things on the “Advantages of living in Switzerland” list than there is on the “Disadvantages of living in Switzerland”. However, one of the big disadvantages is being away from friends and family for long periods of time. In some respects, I feel as though I am used to it now. The beginning was hard but as time goes on, I have found this becomes ever so slightly easier but being away from new family members is a tough situation.

I don’t mean this in the sense of “Out of sight, Out of mind”. I mean I have just accepted that the relationships that had before I moved cannot stay the same as they were in the past. We have a huge advantage today of having so many ways of communicating that the world feels smaller than it would have done in the past.

I read an article recently about a woman recalling a time when she was living abroad and received a phone call. What struck me was that she said she knew that the news must be bad because in those days no one made a long distance phone call unless someone had died.

Today, we have free communication via Skype, Whatsapp, Facetime. I wonder if we really are more connected to our fellow man than we were in the pas?. I suspect with our lack of understanding and respect for other cultures, this is probably not the case.

All too soon, the weekend is over and I am at the airport, ready to fly back, preparing myself for work again on Monday morning. I will be back soon. One thing for sure is, I still don’t miss the British weather…

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*And, I actually landed early back in Switzerland with no long customs queue or passport control. A personal record!

Fun Filled Weekend!

2 Sep

I had an excellent weekend, the weekend just gone.  I spent most of it out of my apartment which is always good when the weather is nice.

On Friday night I went to a Japanese restuarant in Zurich. It’s called Sala of Japan and it’s actually my favourite Japanese restaurant. I have only just started to eat Japanese food so maybe my opinion isn’t the best informed. We had the taster menu which was extremely expensive but was worth every penny. It was a nine-course meal and took about 2 hours to complete! Some of the highlights were Sea Eel, which I never, ever thought I would like, a popcorn fritter and tempura vegetables and, of course, Wagyu beef in seasame and spring onions. Here is the menu and a sample of the food on offer…. Definitely a great way to start the weekend.

 

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On Saturday morning I went to Bern. I have been to Bern before and it is my favourite city in Switzerland. Again, like the Japanese food, I have only been to a limited number of Swiss cities so my opinion might not be the best informed. As a city it is a lot more laid back than Zurich is and is just beautiful.

The main reason for going to Bern this time was because last time I didn’t quite have enough time to go to Einstein’s house. Albert Einstein lived and worked in Switzerland (in Bern and Zurich) for a long time in his life but Bern was the place where he made significant breakthroughs and had his annus mirabilis in 1905. The house is a small, inconspicuous place on a small street called Kramstrasse 49 and provided a reall y good insight into his life and work. It only cost 6 CHF for the entrance fee. Well worth a visit. More information is available here http://www.einstein-bern.ch/index.php?lang=en

After the visit to the house, I went to the permanent exhibition housed at Bern’s National Museum. The exhibit was really well put together and had lots more information about the life of Einstein, the harsh political times that he lived in and explantions about the Theory of Relativity. I could have easily spent hours and hours there but unfortunately the museum shuts at 5pm.

 

View from Kramstrasse 49, Bern, where Einstein lived for 2 years.

View from Kramstrasse 49, Bern, where Einstein lived for 2 years.

I will write more about Bern in a separate post. Watch out for an update soon!

On Sunday, I travelled to Appenzell where the famous Swiss beer is brewed. It’s a lovely place situated right in the mountains and isn’t too far away from the German or Liechtenstein borders. Obviously the point of the trip was to visit the famous brewery for a tour and a beer tasting session. There were several beers that we could sample (see below) and the lady who looked after our group told us how they were made and what the different ingredients were. Despite her protestations to the contray, her English was very good, as is always the case with Swiss people.  I rounded the day off with a Corden-Bleu and french fries, which was made with Appenzell cheese which is also famous in Switzerland. Needless to say I fell asleep on the train home.

 

 

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All in all, a very successful weekend. I got to see more of Switzerland and have a few beers in the process!