Tag Archives: travelling

Leaving on a jet plane

17 Feb

By the time you read this I will be on my way to sunnier climbs – South America! The next few weeks are going to be intense: reunited with the boyfriend that I have only seen on and off for ten and a half months; travelling through five different countries, three different time zones, where they speak two different languages; experiencing sights, sounds and food that I have never experienced before.

For some people this might sound like something from a horror film. For me, this is heaven. Although I will take some trepidation with me, which I think is completely natural when leaving home for so long, I can’t wait.

One thing I am most looking forward to is the warm weather. It will most likely be too warm for me but I will endeavour to keep myself cool by drinking ice cold, local beer.

Fear not, dear Reader, I have already scheduled some posts while I am away, so you will still be able to read some of my musings and ramblings while I am no the road. I will also be posting a few updates while I am away, if time allows.

So, I’m leaving on a jet plane. I know when I will be home again* because a new job awaits me after the Easter break.

*Apologies to John Denver.

luggage-2708829__340

Travel preparations

13 Jan

As you may or may not know, I love to travel. Since I first set off on a solo trip to Peru in 2011, I haven’t stopped exploring. In my case, it is certainly true when people say that travelling is a bug that you catch. I enjoying seeing other parts of the world and seeing how other people live. As well as trying different types of food, of course.

Soon I will be heading off on another adventure. This one will be longer than I have ever done before. It will be 35 days, in fact, and we will be visiting five different countries in South America. We have already booked all of the flights, buses, boats and hotels.

I find preparing for the travel almost as exciting as the travelling itself. I can spend hours pouring over books, the Internet and asking people for suggestions and recommendations. It’s so much fun to thinking that in a few weeks you will be doing X, Y or Z, or even all three!

One part of travelling that I am not such a fan of is the packing. For a beach holiday, a weekend away or going back home, I can cope. Just throw some things in a suitcase and off you go. It’s only for a couple of weeks or days so there is not a lot of planning needed.

For five weeks on the road, spending only a few days in each place, it is a bit more difficult. I have found in a lot of my recent trips that I tend to panic just before I am about to leave the house and end up throwing things into the bag because I am convinced that I might need a heavy-duty rain jacket in South Africa in summer or I should definitely pack that exfoliating face pack from the bathroom because that would really be useful while camping in the wild in Botswana. Incidentally, I have stopped taking makeup with me on holidays where the weather is hot because I realised it is a waste of time to think that I will feel the need to apply makeup when I am basically melting from the heat. I very rarely wear make-up at home so it doesn’t really make that much difference to me.

I always make a list of things to take and I try to stick to it but it doesn’t always work. As we will be on the move every few days, it makes sense to pack as light as possible. I have been having a personal struggle about whether to take my electric tooth brush or not. On the one hand, it does mean that I have to take yet another charging cable with me (along with phone charger, battery pack for my camera, activity tracker, Kindle etc) but I think that it is the type of luxury that I don’t think that I can go without for five weeks. Plus oral hygiene, as dentists will tell you, is not a part-time hobby so I am almost 100% decided that it will be coming with me.

I read once that for these longer trips, you should pack everything once and then take everything out of the suitcase and take half of the clothes and double the amount of money. This is probably very good advice. There have been more than a few times when I have got back home from a trip to find at least three articles of clothing stuffed in the bottom of my bag that I haven’t used and that I forgot I had even packed.

However, and let’s face it, if I had double the amount of money available, I would be going for double the amount of time. Perhaps only the advice about the number of clothes applies to me.

I will attempt to be very strict with my packing, as I have been with my travel planning, but good intentions and all that. I still have about five weeks to agonise about what and what not to take. Do you see now why this is the part that I dislike the most?

luggage-2708829__340

What has annoyed me most this year

22 Nov

What has annoyed me most this year is perhaps not so surprising. I have spent a lot of time in airports and travelling. It isn’t the actually travelling that has been annoying. Although at one point, I was longing to stay at home and just relax in my own environment. The thing that annoys me about travelling is other people.

If I could get to the airport, board a plane to myself and not have to interact with anyone at all during this time, I would be over the moon. Other people just make travelling more stressful.

It isn’t even other passangers that irritate me. But there is always more than one person, wheeling a trolley behind them with no ide how to control it. People wheeling luggage also forget the concept of other people and think that ambling along without a care in the world, while blocking the way for people trying to get to their gate, is a completely acceptable state of affairs.

Then there are the people who can’t possibly have been on a plane before. Nor have they read any of the 100 signs in the queue for security that say that any fluids need to be in a transparent, plastic bag. The look of surprise on their faces amazes me when they realise that they now have to rout around in the bag to get the contraband out and in the correct bag to be inspected. How can anyone not know the regulations and not ready themselves for it well in advance?

Then there is the person at security with the tray who asks, as I am unzipping my bag to get out my already-prepared, plastic bag. Once I almost turned round and said, “Give me a bloody minute will you, love?” But I didn’t know how to say it in French so I decided to give it a miss. And then she asked me if I had an iPad. I pointed to the iPad which was already sitting in the tray, waiting to be scanned. I’m sure that these people are so bored that they are trying to make conversation

Nothing irritates me more than when I finally get on the plane and someone else have take all the space in the locker above the seat. I have seen people get on planes and put their luggage in the first available locker even though they are sat at the back of the plane. Do not be these people. It is so unhelpful and a huge pain in the ass because it means that your luggage is not next to you when you come to get off. So you have to wait until you can go to the back of the plane to find it.

Taking of leaving the aircraft: where exactly do people think that they are going when they get up before the seat belt sign has been switched off. Everyone has been expressedly been told not to take off their seatbelt but people do at the first opportunity. What advantage do they think that they can gain on their fellow passangers when the crew are still strapped into their seats? Planes aren’t like buses or trains. If you don’t get off on a bus within 30 seconds or less, you have missed your stop and will have to get off at somewhere that you don’t want to. With a plane, everyone has arrived at their final destination. If you don’t get off now, it doesn’t mean that you have to wait for the next stop which is in 13 hours and is in Hong Kong. It does annoy me that people can’t take listen to instructions and do what someone else tells them to. If this is how adults behave, how can we expect children to behave any better?

Rant over. That is until I head off to the aiport again, which, knowing me, won’t be too long at all.

 

 

Old problem, new experience

17 Nov

This week in Switzerland I have encountered an age-old problem which resulted a new and slightly surprising experience. The three words mostly likely to instill fear and dread into a commuter back home are: replacement bus service.

After 5 years, it was the first time that have experienced this in Switzerland. They are working at night on the train line that runs through our village and, because my German lesson finishes at 9, I had to alight one stop before I would normally and take the bus.

I have taken so many bus replacement services over the year in England and I won’t be coy about it. I hate them. With a passion. I am sure that anyone who had taken them is much of the same view.

Things were different here. The bus is already waiting. The bus looks big enough to take all of the passengers. The driver responds cheerfully when you ask if this bus is going to your stop. It’s like a parallel universe.

Normally the bus replacement takes forever and the bus manages to take a route which virtually passes every residential street in the area and doesn’t seem to go the most direct route. It could be that I was lucky that my stop was the first one but I was actually home only five minutes later than I would be if the train had gone to my stop. I was also quite lucky that the service was at night and the roads were a lot quieter.

gleise-1555348__340

It makes me wonder why more repairs to essential services are not done in the UK at night. It makes it a lot easier and a lot less stressful for commuters. All that seems to happen though, is that the price are increased, the services are worse and no one is happy about it.

Coincidentally, I also noticed this week that they don’t have cat’s eyes in Switzerland. I’m not sure why I haven’t realised this before. I researched this on the internet a bit and it seems that cat’s eyes are only know in UK, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Ireland and the US. For those of you how don’t know, cat’s eyes are a reflective device that are placed along road markings to help drivers at night. They were invented in England and get their name because the device work on a similar basis as to how cat’s eyes work.

As a child, I was traumatised by someone telling me that they actually put dead cat’s eyes in the middle of the road. I really could imagine roadworks scooping up the dead eyes and cementing them into the middle of the road.

Thankfully that story was not true but every time I see cat’s eyes, I still wonder if the cat had a good life and if he would have wanted to have lived on helping drivers stay safe.