Tag Archives: reflections

Moving on…

14 Feb

Today was my last day in my current job. I handed in my resignation just before New Year, after I had accepted a job offer from another company. At the time, I was worried I had made the wrong choice: now I am just itching to get started at the new place.

I know, however, that the grass isn’t always greener. Of course, when you are looking for a new job, it is because you are not happy in your current one. When ever anyone describes a new job or a new company, it instantly sounds amazing and so much better than what you are currently doing. That is not very often the case though.

There is always a honeymoon period for anything that is new. In a new job it takes you six to nine months to get used to the new commute, the people and to get your head around the tasks that you need to understand and get completed. After this time, everything becomes a bit more routine. I work in finance after all, so there isn’t much room to be so creative. You spend a lot of time doing the same tasks over and over again every month. That is the nature of the beast.

Like a marriage, the longer you can prolong the honeymoon period, the longer the job will last. I have a feeling that this new job could go the distance. Without boring you too much, I will be joining a very young organisation, where there needs to be a lot of new systems implemented and old systems made to be more efficient. It sounds right up my street and this is something that I can really see myself enjoying.

This is highly dependent on, however, my expectation and if they are in line with the truth. Interviews are funny things because the organisation is trying to sell themselves to the candidates and vice versa. Of course, you don’t tell them something undesirable. If everyone in the department has quit because the coffee machine is broken, they won’t tell you this in the interview. Even so, I do have a good feeling about this new challenge. And if the coffee machine is broken, I will just drink tea, like I normally do. Problem Solved!

My new office is not far away from my old office so I can still keep in touch with colleagues and meet them for lunch once in a while.

For once in my life, I will not be hopping from one job to the next. I have my South America trip first before settling down to life in the Real World.

They say that a change is as good as a rest. I will be having a rest and then a change. I might be ready for world domination by August…

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Testing times

10 Feb

On the first Wednesday of February each year, the sirens are tested across Switzerland. Even though the testing is publicised in the newspaper, radio and television to remind people that it is just a test, I had completely forgotten this week until the piercing sounds rang out at about lunchtime. The sirens last for about one minute and sounds about as apocolyptic as it gets. I have no idea what tourists think when suddenly all of the sirens begin.

I can’t even begin to imagine what it would have been like to be alive in the blitz and to hear these sirens again and again, day after day. I also find it about surprising that a country that hasn’t been to war in over 500 years feels the need to have a general alert signal but we have nothing like this back in England. I guess we would have to just rely on social media and the BBC to tell us if a state of emergency had been declared.

In the current political climate, it is easy to see why such practices still take place. Virtually every morning when I wake up, the first thing I do is check the news to make the rest of the world hasn’t been destroyed by one of our world leaders accidentally pressing a button that they shouldn’t have.

When my friend came to stay last weekend, she was surprised that we had a nuclear bunker built into the house. The entire population of Switzerland can be accomodated in nuclear bunkers with a reinforced steel door, if the need arises. This might seem paranoid but people in the UK were still building nuclear bunkers into the 1980s. The bunkers are also checked periodically as well. Inside they have a built-in radio so that messages can be relaid about what it happening and when it is safe to leave the bunker.

Our nuclear bunker is actually what we use as a basement now. So, if we did have to go down there and shelter, we would be sharing the space with ski equipment, bikes, recycling that needs to be taken to the recycling centre and a nice collection of wine. I remain hopeful that these things are like travel insurance: you have it just in case but you never have to use it. Let’s hope it stays that way.

40 Before 40: Challenge #17

2 Feb

I am officially 8.5% of the way through the seventeenth challenge on my 40 Before 40 list. My 17th challenge is to write a diary every day for a year. 31 days of the year have already been and gone so I can be very accurate with how much of this challenge I have completed.

The reason I decided to add this challenge to my list was because I have tried several times to write a diary for a whole year and I have always failed after a few weeks. I’m not sure why I have managed to fail so often but this time I am determined to complete the challenge. Of course, if I fail to complete the challenge again in 2018, I still have a few more years to try to complete it.

Recently I have been wondering why people write diaries at all. Famous diarists, like Anne Frank and Samuel Pepys, would never had known that their daily musings on every day life would be still being read today and the insights that they would be able to give to us into historic events.

I have no doubt that what I sit down and write each time before I go to bed will possibly never be read by a wider audience and probably not even by myself. Personally, it had more to do with the act of sitting down at the end of the day to reflect on what I have achieved and what I have found difficult about the day. I have found, even at this early stage, that it offers time to sit quietly after a day which might have been very busy or stressful. This is something that modern life doesn’t often allow us to have.

I was hoping that it would also help to clean out my thoughts before I go to bed and, therefore, help me in my New Year’s Resolution to get more and better quality sleep. Unfortunately, I haven’t found this helps all that much. People often advise that writing something down that you are struggling with during the day is a good way for you to get these thoughts out of your head. I find the opposite is true. After writing things down, I find that I want to think more about these things and try to solve them if possible.

I will persevere though. It takes 66 days to form a new habit. So I still have a number of days to go until this has become a habit. It does help that I have set a recurring alarm on my phone so that I remember to do it every day and the diary lives on the bedside table. There is no way that I have been able to forget to make my diary entry for the day. Every habit needs a bit of encouraging and I hope that my sneaky tricks to make sure that I write every day will get me closer to ticking off another challenge from my list.

My very colourful diary

My very colourful diary

40 Before 40: Challenge #4

24 Jan

My fourth challenge on my #40Before40 list is to enter a photography competition. On the face on it, this doesn’t seem to be a very hard challenge but, as with anything that has a creative element to it, it can sometimes be difficult to be objective and to assess something that you have created.

Also, I am very much an amateur photographer. I don’t claim to be an expert at all. I tend to just point and shoot what I see. I know that I have taken a few good photographs but this has often been as a result of good luck rather than good judgement.

I am a bit of a purist when it comes to photography. Lots of people spend hours and hours after taking a photograph using Photoshop and various other editing tools. People improve light and colours and, in my opinion, sometimes this means that the photo doesn’t look “real”.

Apart from cropping a few photos to make sure that they are better framed, I leave my photos well alone. The fact that I am not so familiar with all of these editing programmes also has a bit to do with it. A photo captures a certain point in time and it is often the case that an “imperfect” moment helps to give more character and a better impression than something that has been edited post-production.

It was hard choosing the photos to enter for the competition. The photos that I have been really proud of never look as impressive when you are trying to look at them through the eyes of a critic.

In the end, I decided to enter three photos. The competition was for photographers, both professionals and amateurs alike, who are based in Zurich and the surrounding areas. There was no limit on what images could be entered so long as the photograph was your own.

Two of pictures I entered were taken in Switzerland and one of them was taken when I was in Cambodia in April 2017.

Here is one of the photos, which I have called A Goat’s Eye View because why should birds get to see everything?

I very much doubt that the photos I have entered will make the shortlist of the Best 50 which are then exhibited to the public in Zurich. The public will then be able to vote for the winner. I will, of course, let you know if I do get a surprising result!

Photo an Hour: 20th January 2018

22 Jan

Last Saturday I took part in the first Photo an Hour of 2018. The idea is that you take a photo every hour for a day and published it on social media.

Like last time I have made a summary of the whole day for my blog. Here is what I got up to…

8am: Cuppa to start the day

9am: Catching up on some current affairs

10am: Going for a walk before the rain comes

11am: It’s colder out here than I thought it would be

12pm: Power smoothie for lunch

1pm: Shopping done

2pm: Ok so I went back to the supermarket because this was on offer and I didn’t have the car with me

3pm: I have finally fended off procrastination and I’m doing some writing

4pm: Writing was going nowhere fast so I’m doing some reading

5pm: Getting some dinner ready

6pm: Accident in the kitchen

7pm: Settling down for some television watching

8pm: Still sofa bound but now with hot drink

9pm: Last photo of the day – Writing in my diary

And that was my (fairly uneventful) 20th January 2018.

Travel preparations

13 Jan

As you may or may not know, I love to travel. Since I first set off on a solo trip to Peru in 2011, I haven’t stopped exploring. In my case, it is certainly true when people say that travelling is a bug that you catch. I enjoying seeing other parts of the world and seeing how other people live. As well as trying different types of food, of course.

Soon I will be heading off on another adventure. This one will be longer than I have ever done before. It will be 35 days, in fact, and we will be visiting five different countries in South America. We have already booked all of the flights, buses, boats and hotels.

I find preparing for the travel almost as exciting as the travelling itself. I can spend hours pouring over books, the Internet and asking people for suggestions and recommendations. It’s so much fun to thinking that in a few weeks you will be doing X, Y or Z, or even all three!

One part of travelling that I am not such a fan of is the packing. For a beach holiday, a weekend away or going back home, I can cope. Just throw some things in a suitcase and off you go. It’s only for a couple of weeks or days so there is not a lot of planning needed.

For five weeks on the road, spending only a few days in each place, it is a bit more difficult. I have found in a lot of my recent trips that I tend to panic just before I am about to leave the house and end up throwing things into the bag because I am convinced that I might need a heavy-duty rain jacket in South Africa in summer or I should definitely pack that exfoliating face pack from the bathroom because that would really be useful while camping in the wild in Botswana. Incidentally, I have stopped taking makeup with me on holidays where the weather is hot because I realised it is a waste of time to think that I will feel the need to apply makeup when I am basically melting from the heat. I very rarely wear make-up at home so it doesn’t really make that much difference to me.

I always make a list of things to take and I try to stick to it but it doesn’t always work. As we will be on the move every few days, it makes sense to pack as light as possible. I have been having a personal struggle about whether to take my electric tooth brush or not. On the one hand, it does mean that I have to take yet another charging cable with me (along with phone charger, battery pack for my camera, activity tracker, Kindle etc) but I think that it is the type of luxury that I don’t think that I can go without for five weeks. Plus oral hygiene, as dentists will tell you, is not a part-time hobby so I am almost 100% decided that it will be coming with me.

I read once that for these longer trips, you should pack everything once and then take everything out of the suitcase and take half of the clothes and double the amount of money. This is probably very good advice. There have been more than a few times when I have got back home from a trip to find at least three articles of clothing stuffed in the bottom of my bag that I haven’t used and that I forgot I had even packed.

However, and let’s face it, if I had double the amount of money available, I would be going for double the amount of time. Perhaps only the advice about the number of clothes applies to me.

I will attempt to be very strict with my packing, as I have been with my travel planning, but good intentions and all that. I still have about five weeks to agonise about what and what not to take. Do you see now why this is the part that I dislike the most?

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Good Luck for the year ahead!

2 Jan

Although I have been in Switzerland for New Year for the last three years, this year I learnt something new about what charms the Swiss think will bring good luck.

I went to a friend’s house on New Year’s Eve, where there was, what I can only describe as paraphernalia, to help predict what the year ahead will bring. This was a spoon, small bits of metal (which type I am not sure), a candle and a bowl of water. The basic idea is that you put a piece of the metal on the spoon and heat this over the candle. When the metal is melted, you pour the molten liquid into the water. The shape that the metal makes is then a prediction of what will happen to you for the next year. There is a small interpretation book provided, so you can check out the meanings.

My form looked like a rain drop or a meteor. These shapes weren’t described in the interpretation booklet so I settle for on it looking like a ball. This means that I should play more sport in the upcoming year. This is probably a fair assessment and much more preferable than what the two other options could signify: namely, spending a lot more time in the rain or the end of the world as we know it is right around the corner.

I have never seen or heard of this before, but the kits are available in the local supermarkets. It was interesting to see how many different forms and shapes were made. Of course, it is just a bit of fun but at a party, it was an interesting ice-breaker.

I was also handed a miniature figure of a chimney sweep. Apparently, in Germany and Switzerland, the chimney sweep is a very lucky symbol – a bit like a four-leaf clover. I think that this was doubly lucky for me because I was given the figure by an actual chimney sweep.

img_9896As I had never heard of the connection of luck with a chimney sweep before, I decided to do a bit of research on the Internet before. Because, as is often the case, when I asked why a chimney sweep has a connection to good luck in Switzerland and Germany, no one could actually give me an answer. I was met with a shrug, a blank facial expression and the answer “I’m not really sure. We just always hand them out at this time of year.”

So, I found out that a chimney sweep is good luck for purely pragmatic reasons. If a chimney was blocked, it meant that you would not be able to cook anymore and so you would have to get the chimney sweep to come round. Once the flue was cleaned, you could carry on eating again. Hurray! It also meant that there was less chance of the house catching fire because of the soot stuck in the chimney.

I think the connection is completely charming. It is a shame that this is a profession which is possibly in decline, as we tend not to have houses with fire places, as we did in the olden days. But through the giving of these charms the legend will live on for generations to come.

I am a firm believer in the phrase that you make your own luck, but it still nice to have a few good luck charms tucked away just in case.