Tag Archives: literature

Book Challenge by Erin 10.0 – Bonus Round

9 Mar

To coincide with World Book Day this week, I completed the bonus round of my online reading challenge. If you have been following my blog, you will know that I finished the first round and ten books in an extraordinarily fast time. If you want to remind yourself you can check it out here.

Once the first round is completed, you can go on to take part in a bonus round, which is reading books based on the same categories but trying to read books that have been chosen by other people who are taking part in the challenge. When you finish reading a book, you make a comment about it so that people can see if the books is worth reading or not.

Here are the books that I read for the bonus round:

Freebie (any book that is more than 200 pages long) – Me Before You by JoJo Moyes

I have heard a lot about Jojo Moyes but I have avoided reading any of her books so far because I thought that they were going to be too girly and sentimental. If I hadn’t taken part in this challenge I would never have taken read this book. I am glad that I did though. It wasn’t a classic boy-meet-girl story. It dealt with a some very gritty subjects and taboos.

Book that was turned into a Movie – Water For Elephants by Sara Gruen

This was a great read about the story of the vet from a travelling circus. He ends up joining the circus after failing to take his final veterinary exams after his parents suddenly die. The different characters make the story and the descriptions of the animals, performances and the events are excellent. The story is told from different points in time so you learn about what happens long after the circus stops travelling. A highly recommended read.

Set in Europe – Dracula by Bram Stoker

This is another classic that up until now I haven’t got round to read. There was an ominous feeling to the book from the very start. Because the book is written from different points of view in the form of letters and diaries, the reader gets a holistic view of everything that is happening. Even though I knew that Count Dracula was the source of strange happenings, I still found it shocking when it was revealed that there were “two small puncture wounds on the neck”. I can imagine that reading this when it was first published without knowing the real identity of Dracula would be truly horrifying.

A Newberry Award Winner – The Cat Who Went to Heaven by Elizabeth Coatsworth

This was an interesting and very quick read but I can’t say that I absolutely fell in love with it. The story is set in Japan and centres around a painter who has been commissioned to make a painting for the local temple. He wins the commission after his housekeeper brings home a cat. The painter believes that the cat is lucky and calls it “Good Fortune”.

A Friend’s Favourite – Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger 

The only thing that I didn’t like about this book was that there wasn’t more of it. The narrator is a boy who has been expelled from boarding school because of his constant poor grades. I felt the sense that he is completely lost and angst-ridden and unsure about what he wants to do with his life but doesn’t know where to turn to. I particularly enjoyed the interesting take he has on events that happened around him and some of the expressions that he uses.

Written over 100 years ago – The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

It took me a while to get into this book. I’m not sure if that’s because I haven’t read anything else from Mark Twain and the only thing I knew about the Tow Sawyer books that he is famous for is because they are set in the southern states in America. Huckleberry Finn fakes his own murder/disappearance and the book is about what he does while he is “on the run”. I’m not sure that this book made me desperately pick up any more of Mark Twain’s books and read them. I also thought that the ending was a little bit rushed.

Title with 6 Words – The Way Things Look to Me by Roopa Farooki

I found this book in a second hand bookshop and bought it especially for this challenge because I was having problems finding another book with a six word title. The story is about a girl with Asperger’s syndrome and what affect that has on her relationship with her brother and sister after their mother dies. I thought the book was inspiring and explored the complexity of sibling relationships.

Cardinal direction in the title – East of Eden by John Steinbeck

I had high hopes for this book; people who had read it before me had commented that it was an epic masterpiece. I liked it but it’s definitely not one of my favourite books of all time. It charts the story of two brothers, who are complete opposites, and how their lives unfold. There are numerous complications for them – from their relationship with their father to the women who enter their lives. I didn’t really feel very invested into the story until about a third of the way through. Having said that, I was disappointed when it ended because I wanted to know what happened to the characters in the end

Originally in another language – Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka

This is a bizarre concept for a story but is beautifully told. A travelling salesman wakes up one morning to discover that he has turned into an insect overnight. He struggles to adjust and understand his new condition and his family are also shocked by his transformation. I felt sorry for both him as he tries to communicate with people but can’t and his mother who is convinced that his condition is only temporary. The ending was tragic as he is shunned by this family.

Begins with the letter N – The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks

This is another very popular book that I have avoided to read until now. However it is beautifully and sensitively written. It tells the story of a couple who, despite her moving away and becoming engaged to someone else, fall in love. The story switches from present day when the couple are old and living in residential care and the past when they fall in love.

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Book challenge – Bonus Round

28 Nov

Those of you who have been reading my blog for a while will know that I signed up to take part in a reading challenge. The basic premise is that there are ten categories and you have to read a book in each category to complete the challenge. The challenge lasts for four months and if you complete the first round you can then take part in the bonus round.

I managed to finish the first round of the challenge relatively quickly. These are the books that I read and what I thought of them. I decided the take on the bonus round as well. The bonus round is the same categories of books again but you collect extra points by choosing books that other people participating in the challenge have already selected.

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Unfortunately, I didn’t quite manage to read every choice off my bonus round list. I was getting dangerously close to the start of my German exam so I made the brave and dedicated step of stopping the challenge to reading some books in German to help me learn a bit more for the exam. So I was still reading but just not for the challenge.

Here are the eight books that I managed to read for the bonus round:

Exposed by Roberta Kray

I have read a few of Kray’s books before and the plot of this book was very similar to other books that she’s written. Having said that it was a real page turner. I wasn’t sure how the book was going to finish until right at the last moment. It was an easy read and I would recommend it.

Northhanger Abbey by Jane Austen

I have been getting into my classic novels recently so I thought that I would give this one a go. I didn’t think that this book was as good as her other novels and I can see why her other works are more famous. I felt that the end of the novel was rushed and I had a lot of questions that weren’t answer. Overall, I was a bit disappointed.

The Last Anniversary by Liane Moriarty

I have read at least two of Moriarty’s books before. I didn’t think that this was as good as The Husband Secret but I still enjoyed it. The characters were realistic and the author was constantly teasing the reader throughout the story. I was desperately trying to work out the explanation for the story but failed, even though all of the clues were there. After reading this book, I got a good idea for a book, which I have started writing. Watch this space!

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

I read this in less than a day. I had heard a lot about it and I was disappointed after reading it. The subject matter isn’t the most pleasant (children being treated for cancer) but I thought that the plot was a bit predictable. I think the predictability had a bit to do with the genre and because that is what the readers expect (or don’t). I can see what the book has been so successful though.

Wuthering Heights by Emile Bronte

This book wasn’t what I was expecting at all. I can honestly say that I have never hated someone living or dead, fictional or real than Heathcliffe. I really despised him and I only read on because I wanted to make sure that he got his comeuppance. It was interesting that the story was narrated by Mr Lockwood who was guest and not one of the main characters. It gave the story an certain sense of objectivity.

The Happiness Project by Gretchen Rubin

I was so disappointed with the book and I would never have finished this if I had’ve chosen it for the challenge. I was really hoping that it would have been enlightening – the story is about how the author spent a year trying to improve her life and happiness. It was less of an epiphany and more of a bit of common sense written over pages and pages of boring drivel.

Captains Courageous by Rudyard Kipling

This is a perfect example of a book that I would never have read if it was for the challenge. I hadn’t even heard of this book before. It was the story of a boy being washed overboard and him being rescued by another ship where his status and wealth counts for nothing and he needs to work to earn his keep onboard and learn how to get along with the crew members.

The Last Juror by John Grisham

I was surprised that this was less about a court trial and more about the story of the last juror who is selected for a trial. The verdict of the trial was fairly cut and dry so this is why it wasn’t the subject of the novel. I thought it was an interesting spin for the story and racism and other important themes were touched upon.

I’m so glad that I decided to take part in the book challenge. I’ve managed to read books that I never would have without the challenge. It also means that I have smashed my reading goal for this year by reading 60 books so far this year. Not all of them have been more than 200 pages but I still think it and impressive total and there is one more month to go.

I can’t wait for January 2019 when the next edition of the book challenge will begin!

Book Challenge By Erin – completed!

15 Aug

Recently I stumbled upon a reading challenge which is run via a Facebook group. The challenge is relatively easy. There are ten categories and you have to read one book from each category. The books have to be at least 200 pages long. You then have four months to read the books that you have chosen.

The challenge started on 1st July and I am pleased (and a little bit surprised) to say that on Monday I finished the challenge! I found the challenge a lot of fun and it also meant that I was able to read some books that have been on my to-read list for an extraordinary length of time and also to read some books that I would never normally even think about reading.

Here is a quick review of the books that I have been busy reading:

Freebie (any book of your choice that is at least 200 pages long)

I chose Murder Games by James Patterson. This is the easiest read on my list by a long way. I have read a lot of James Patterson books and they are an easy read. As this is my first challenge I thought that having an easier read to begin with would be a good idea. This story was about the race to stop a serial killer. A university professor and detective team up to find the killer before he strikes again. There are quite a lot of plot twists that keep you guessing right until the end!

Read a book that starts with the letter “N

I chose Nocturnes: Five Stories of Music and Nightfall by Kazuo Ishiguro. I really enjoyed this book. A lot of Ishiguro’s books are long and not very accessible but these short stories were easier to read. I liked that each of the stories was about music and that the first and the last stories were connected. It felt like I was reading a novel rather than several stories that had no connection with one another. I especially liked the description of the Swiss couple who are holidaying in England in the third story because I thought the mannerisms and attitude of the pair were very accurate.

Read a book that has a (mostly) orange cover

I chose Appointment with Death by Agatha Christie. I have never read any Agatha Christie novels so I thought this might be a good place to start. It was clear right from the start the a murder had been committed and it made a nice change to start in the middle of the action rather than waiting for a long build up before you knew who the victim was. The case was all solved within a matter of hours and I wasn’t expecting the twist at the end of the novel (because it never is the butler who’s done it).

Read a book that has an unlikeable character

I chose The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath. I think just about everyone read this during my teenage years at school – apart from me. Knowing Plath’s personal demons, I have been avoiding reading it. Although mental health is a main theme of the book, I was pleasantly surprised how well-written and engaging it was. The analogy with the fig tree would have perhaps had a greater impact on me had I have read it in my teenage years but being older I can appreciate the cleverness of the imagery.

Read a book from the list of 100 books that PBS calls “The Great American Read” 

I chose The Color Purple by Alice Walker. I have been meaning to read this for a while. There were a lot of books on the list that I thought would be interesting to read but I decided on this one. There are a lot of difficult themes that are tackled in the book, namely racism and abuse, and, although they made me think about these themes in more detail, it was necessarily an enjoyable read.

Read a book with something related to water in the title

I chose The Falls by Ian Rankin. I have read quite a few Rankin novels and I had this book anyway. It seemed like a good opportunity to stop this book from gathering dust on the book shelf. The book is one of many in the Inspector Rebus series and Rebus and his colleagues have to find out who killed a student. When the case is then linked to unsolved murders dating back over the last 30 years, the investigation takes an unexpected turn. There is also an interesting subplot because the student was involved in an online role playing game. It also looks like Inspector Rebus may have fallen in love finally, after his marriage fell apart because of his commitment to his job.

Read a book you’ve owned the longest but haven’t read

I chose Porno by Irvine Welsh. I am not 100% sure that this is the book I have had the longest as there are a lot of contenders for that but I have been meaning to read this for a long while. This is actually the sequel to Welsh’s Trainspotting novel that was the basis of the film of the same name. I read Trainspotting and enjoyed it immensely. Both of these books (and quite a few of Welsh’s other books) are written, at least partly, in Scottish dialect so it is a bit of challenging read, which is why it has been on the “To read” list for so long.

The start of the book was quite predictable. The characters from the Trainspotting book are now (largely) clean and drug-free but in an attempt to make a quick buck they decide to get involved in the making of a pornography film. It took a while to get going because it was obvious what was going to happen. The book is told from all of the characters perspectives which I thought was interesting. There is a plot twist at the end that I wasn’t expecting. But beware if you decide to read this – there are some characters who curse with every other word that they use.

Read a book with an emotion word in the title 

I chose The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan. I recently bought this book and luckily it fits nicely into this category. Luckily (please excuse the pun), I really enjoyed this book. A interesting exploration about how much of our lives and personalities are influenced by our heritage and our family. The descriptions of the many, many Chinese superstitions and beliefs were also fascinating!

Read a book (must be at least 2 words in the title) where each word in the title of the book begins with the same letter 

I chose Black Beauty by Anna Sewell. I have never read this, even though I can hear the theme tune of the TV series in my head the moment that I think of the title. I don’t know very much about the plot apart from there is a black horse in it. I was surprised that this book was written from the point of view of the horse. During the book, the horse experiences good and bad masters and how he sees other horses being treated.

Read a book featuring a character who shares your profession or a similar one

I chose Bonfire of the Vanities by Tom Wolfe. This is a bit of a tenuous link to my job. I work in Finance, most recently in a bank and the main character works in bonds and trades on Wall Street. This is another book that has been gathering dust and, without this challenge, I don’t think that I would be attempting to read it. This was a long book (720 pages). Although I had left this book to the end and it felt like I was never going to finish it, I think it might be one of my favourite books of all time. The plot is straight-forward but the political ramifications are quite complex. I liked the way that all the characters had strong mannerisms and how the action in the book was relentless.

There is now a bonus round to the challenge which I have decided to take part in. You have to choose another book from each of the categories but you get extra credit if you read something that someone has already selected. I am not sure if I will have time to complete another 10 books but I will let you know if I do!

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40 Before 40: Challenge #29

19 Sep

One of my challenges for my #40Before40 is to read every book on the 40 Books that Every Woman Should Read list.

My reasoning behind this was that I predominately read books my male authors; more by accident than design. I recently discovered that the Norwegian writer, Jo Nesbo, is actually male. All this time I thought he was a woman, mainly because in English “Jo” is a woman’s name and “Joe” is a man’s name. So, this list will hopefully redress the balance.

There are a number of books on this list that I have part read and not finished. Some of them I definitely started as a young teenager and never go round to finishing.

Of course, I have read all of the Harry Potter books. I was a bit late to the party. I read all of them, one after another, in the summer of 2015. Some of the authors are not as famous as J.K. Rowling but I am sure that their books are equally as worthy of being on the list.

Below is the complete list. Those books highlights in red I have already read. Out of 40 I have read 4. Time to get reading!

  1. The Age of Grief by Jane Smiley
  2. Beloved by Toni Morrison
  3. Unaccustomed Earth by Jhumpa Lahiri
  4. A Visit From the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan
  5. The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
  6. The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton
  7. The History of Love by Nicole Krauss
  8. Near to the Wild Heart by Clarice Lispector
  9. The House of Spirits by Isabelle Allende
  10. Random Family by Adrian Nicole LeBlanc
  11. Play it as it Lays by Joan Didion
  12. The Awakening by Kate Chopin
  13. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
  14. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
  15. The Secret History by Donna Tartt
  16. Runaway by Alice Munro
  17. The Thing Around Your Neck by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  18. Sexing the Cherry by Jeanette Winterson
  19. White Teeth by Zadie Smith
  20. Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic by Alison Bechdel
  21. Cherry by Mary Karr
  22. The Color Purple by Alice Walker
  23. Bastard Out of Carolina by Dorothy Allison
  24. The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand
  25. My Antonia by Willa Cather
  26. Drinking Coffee Elsewhere by Z.Z. Packer
  27. Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling
  28. Willful Creatures by Aimee Bender
  29. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
  30. The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
  31. The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
  32. The Blue Flower by Penelope Fitzgerald
  33. Love Medicine by Louise Erdrich
  34. The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
  35. The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
  36. What Was She Thinking? by Zoe Heller
  37. The Golden Notebook by Doris Lessing
  38. Broken Harbor by Tana French
  39. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  40. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

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