Tag Archives: hobbies

Book Challenge by Erin 11.0 – completed

28 Aug

I have officially finished the first round of the Book Challenge by Erin 11.0 that started on 1st July. The idea is to read a book from 10 different categories. This is the third time I have participated in the challenge and, once again, I have read some interesting books that I wouldn’t have read off my own back.

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Here is a short breakdown of the 10 books I read:

Freebie (any book that is at least 200 pages long):

Stories We Could Tell by Tony Parsons

I bought this from a second hand book shop about six months ago and I had no idea what it was about but I liked the look of the front cover.  I found this book very funny and relatable. I love some of the descriptions in this book. The story takes place on the day that Elvis died and tells the stories of three friends writing for a music magazine.

A book beginning with “F”:

Foucault’s Pendulum by Umberto Eco

This is one of the best books I have ever read. It was a long read, about 650 pages and the style of the writing took some getting used to. The book is about the Knight’s Templar and their alledged involvement in many historical events. The books centres on three bored editors at a publishing house who become obsessed by a theory that is put forward by a potential author. The plot is a complicated mix of history, religion and politics, which is right up my street. I absolutely loved this book, even though it was a challenging read at times.

A book with “rain”, “thunder” or “lightning” in the title:

The Rainmaker by John Grisham

I think this is the second Grisham novel that I have read. I like the style of writing – it is easy to read and the action flows at a good pace. This book was about insurance companies refusing to pay out on a policy. It was interesting to learn more about how these companies make their money and how the underdog can take on corporations. I wasn’t so keen on the ending. It seemed a little unrealistic to me but I won’t spoil the ending for people who want to read it themselves.

A book with a building on the cover:

The Last Tenant by Sarah Kisielowski

This is a book that was written by a friend of mine who goes to the same writing club as me. She has told me a lot about the plot and about the writing process and I am really interested to read the story for myself. The story centres around a man who has to go to Berlin to clear out the apartment of his maternal grandfather, who has passed away. He finds out about his family history through a series of recorded tapes that his grandfather has made. He is surprised to learn the truth about his family.

A book written by an author who has an initial in their name:

Casual Vacancy by J. K. Rowling

I was slightly sceptical about how good this book was going to be. I mean I loved Harry Potter (when I finally got round to reading it) but not every one can right for children and adults with the same degree of success. However, it turns out that J. K. Rowling is the exception that proves the rule. The best thing about this book was that it was set in the countryside and it reminded me a lot about the village where I grew up. When a vacancy suddenly becomes available on the parish council when one of the councillors dies (that is what a causal vacancy is), there is competition to fill the role. The consequences are tragic and thought-provoking but there were part of the story that made me laugh out loud.

A book with an item of clothing in the title:

The Black Glove by Geoffrey Miller

I struggled to find a book for this category and I only found this one by searching the library catalogue. I read this book in one sitting. It was another easy read about the kidnapping of a man’s son who is then found murdered. The plot is complicated but the writing makes the action zip along at a good pace.

A book set in India:

Kim by Rudyard Kipling

I’ve never read anything by Rudyard Kipling, apart from a few poems, so I thought this might be a good book to read. Even though many people claim that this is Kipling’s best work, I wasn’t a big fan of it. It is a semi-autobiographical novel about a young boy growing up in India. I did like the descriptions of Indian culture and reading about how difference life is compared with living in Europe during modern times but the plot didn’t pull me in so that I wanted to read non-stop.

A book shortlisted for the Booker Prize:

Milkman by Anna Burns

This is a recent winner of the Booker Prize. I have heard quite a few bad reviews about it but I actually thought it was well-written. It took me a while (about 50 pages) to realise where the book was set – Ireland – because not much background detail or details to help the reader orientate himself to what is happening in the book. The narrator isn’t even mentioned by name (I don’t think). The narrative refers to “them” and “us” which, if you don’t realise where the book is set, it wouldn’t make any sense. I have heard people say that there is no plot to the book but I definitely thought there was enough things happening in the book to make it entertaining.

A book with a character who has supernatural powers: 

Carrie by Stephen King

I thought this book would keep me up all night. Even though it is a horror story, it wasn’t a blood-and-gore-type story. It’s about a girl with a very abnormal upbringing, who develops the ability to move things with her mind. I felt sorry for the title character because she is very misunderstood by her class mates and the people around her. The book ends with catastophic consequences for the whole town where she lives. I actually read this book very quickly and would recommend it to someone who wanted to read something that was a thriller without being too terrifying.

A book with the same title as a book in another genre:

Wonder by R. J. Palacio

This book made me cry. I can’t remember the last time I cried while I read a book. The story is about a kid who has facial deformities and what happens when he joins a mainstream school. The book is a children’s novel but it is also interesting to read as an adult. Keep the tissues ready for the ending though!

As usual I have decided to tackle the bonus round as well. It has take me so long to get round to writing up the first round of the challenge that I have already finished five out of the ten books that I have picked for the bonus round. So it might not be too long before I’m writing about next ten books I have read for the challenge.

40 Before 40: Challenge #29 completed!

8 Jul

After more page-turning than I can remember, I am finally finished with my Challenge 29! I have now read all of the books on the list of 40 books every woman should read. Some of the books I didn’t enjoy very much but others of them I loved. I am so glad that I decided on this as one of my challenges. I will definitely be hunting down more books by the same authors in the near future.

Here are the last seven books that I read to complete the list:

The History of Love by Nicole Krauss

This book was incredible. I was grasping for breath by the end because I was reading the pages so quickly so that I could get to the end that I forgot to breathe. The characters in the book are all connected to a book called The History of Love somehow and the origins of the book is exploded by switching between the past and the present. The story isn’t long but it is so well written that I had trouble putting the book down. The ending took me by complete surprise. An incredible read!

Broken Harbour by Tana French

When I realised that this was a crime novel I was so excited about reading the book and having found another crime writer to read. I wish I hadn’t wasted my enthusiasm. I thought that the crime and what had happened was leaning towards the very obvious side and for me the pace of the story was relatively slow. It’s a long book; I read pages and pages wondering what was going to be the thrilling out come but I was left constantly disappointed. It was different to the crime novels that I normally read in that there was more description but I prefer crime stories where the description is kept to a minimum so the story has a punchier pace.

My Antonia by Willa Cather

This book was strange. It’s set in the America Midwest and the story revolves around the Shimerda family, who move to America from Bohemia, and their hardships in establishing a new life. Jim, who is the narrator of the story, falls in love with the daughter of the family, Antonia, and learns to read and takes an interest in cooking and housekeeping while becoming very popular with the locals, while he leaves to finish his education. He arrives back to find that she is married with children. It’s a sad story full of regret and missed chances. Jim realises that he never should have left Antonia behind and so does the reader.

The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand

I had looked at some reviews of this book online and I wasn’t looking forward to reading it. Firstly, it is very long (more than 700 pages) and, secondly, there were a lot of unfavourable opinions about the book. I did take me a while to get into the book. It is so descriptive that I was beginning to wonder if the online reviews were going to turn out to be right. Once I got used to the style of writing though, the story was enjoyable. The books centres around two young architects and how different their lives end up as they make different creative and lifestyle choices during their life. The book is essentially about greed and selfishness but I also think there is a message of hope that individuals can triumph over the establishment.

Cherry by Mary Kerr

This was an autobiographical work about the author’s adolescent period. The story itself was very interesting as was the style of the writing. The author used the second person singular throughout the book which is not typical for an autobiography or most other fiction books. It gave the story a very personal edge to it – it felt like I was experiencing what happened to the author at the same moment that I was reading it. Parts of the story were hysterically funny, others I could completely identify with. The book is actually a sequel to an earlier book but I don’t feel I missed out by not having read the first installment.

Random Family by Adrian Nicole LeBlanc

This book was non-fiction and retold the story of a family growing up in the Bronx in the late eighties. Most of the people ended up in jail, regularly took drugs and had problems with their family relationships. It was a long but interesting read that made me realise how privileged my upbringing was.

The Golden Notebook by Doris Lessing

I wanted to like this book so much but I can’t say that I did that much. The book is divided into different notebook that author Anna Wulf documents her life. She then tries to tie all of the stories together in a final ‘golden’ notebook. I found the structure confusing to being with and then one of the notebooks was all about communisim in the 1930s. I’m not a fan of politicial discussion in non-fiction books. Considering the book was written in the 60s, there were liberal discussions about sex and the role of women. I’m now not in a rush to read any more of Lessing’s books which I am disappointed about considering she is a Nobel Prize winner.

And that is all 40 books from the list finished and another one of my challenges is completed. I am so glad that I decided to include this on my list: I’ve read so many books from authors that I haven’t heard of before. Not all of the books have been easy to read or 100% enjoyable but the ones that I did enjoy made the whole challenge worth it.

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Book Challenge by Erin 11.0

19 Jun

In less than two weeks another Book Challenge by Erin is starting and I couldn’t be happier. Since finishing the last challenge, I’ve found it hard to get back into reading and my impressive run rate of an average of 2 books per week at the start of the year has really slipped off.

If I manage to complete the challenge and read all ten books on my list, I will have read more than my target of 52 books for 2019.

Even more exciting for me was that I got to choose one of the book categories for the other participants because I was the third person to complete the challenge in January. My category was “Books shortlised for the Booker Prize”. There are so many books on the list that I thought it would be a good selection for people to choose from.

Here are the categories and books that I have chosen for the challenge (all books have to be over 200 pages long):

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Freebie (any book that is at least 200 pages long):

Stories We Could Tell by Tony Parsons

I bought this from a second hand book shop about six months ago. I have no idea what it is about so it will be a surprise when I start reading it.

A book beginning with “F”:

Foucault’s Pendulum by Umberto Eco

I have had this book for years. I recently moved it to my book shelf in the living room and it has been slowly staring me out but now I have a great excuse to read it. A friend said that it was a hard book to get into but he really enjoyed it. Let’s see…

A book with “rain”, “thunder” or “lightning” in the title:

The Rainmaker by John Grisham

I was struggling to find a book for this category until I found a copy of this lurking on my kindle. I really like being able to read books that I already have at home. It makes the challenge so much easier.

A book with a building on the cover:

The Last Tenant by Sarah Kisielowski

This is a book that was written by a friend of mine who goes to the same writing club as me. She has told me a lot about the plot and about the writing process and I am really interested to learn the whole story in more detail.

A book written by an author who has an initial in their name:

Casual Vacancy by J. K. Rowling

This is another book I picked up from the second-hand bookshop and I have been meaning to read for a while. I think it will be interesting to read something written by her that doesn’t involve wizards and magic.

A book with an item of clothing in the title:

The Black Glove by Geoffrey Miller

This was another category that I struggled to find a book for. All I know about this book is that it is a detective story. I will have to order this from the library when I’m ready to read it.

A book set in India:

Kim by Rudyard Kipling

I’ve never read anything by Rudyard Kipling, apart from a few poems. I have been getting into more historical novels lately so I thought this might be another good book to read. I think I am right in thinking that this is a semi-autobiographical book.

A book shortlisted for the Booker Prize:

Milkman by Anna Burns

This is a recent winner of the Booker Prize. Since buying the book two months ago, I have heard some bad reviews about it. I will try to remain open-minded about it until I have read it myself but I’m now not so keen to read it as I was before.

A book with a character who has supernatural powers: 

Carrie by Stephen King

I am pretty sure that this book will keep me up all night, either because it’s so good I can’t put it down, or because I’ll be so terrified that I can’t get to sleep at night. Even so, I’m looking forward to reading this because I haven’t read any horror stories recently.

A book with the same title as a book in another genre:

Wonder by R. J. Palacio

This is another book that I have heard good things about. It looks like it will be an easy read which I will be glad off because some of the other titles are quite long.

I’m now excited about starting the challenge. Also impressive is that all of the books, apart from one, I already have at home on the shelves or on my kindle, which means that my shelves will be cleared out again for some different titles in the autumn!

Old School Sports

21 Feb

Like most people, I started the year with the intention of being more active and getting fit again. For most of 2018 I was on the treatment table at the local physiotherapist because of a knee injury. This made the year frustrating in terms of health and fitness.

Healed and healthy, I now have no excuses. 2019 has had a great start sport-wise. I decided to rekindle my passion for two sports that I haven’t played for the past 10 years or more, as well as get back into running.

As January and the beginning of February have been very cold, I decided that the best thing to do was stay inside and get in a pool. If I am honest, some of my motivation has come from seeing my niece at her swimming lessons. She loves being in the water so much and enjoys her lessons. I remember going to swimming as a kid and having as much fun as she does. These were simpler times where I would just do the sports that I enjoyed and not because I wanted to maintain my weight.

At first it was hard. It felt a bit boring going back and forth. But I have noticed that I am finding it easier and I feel a lot stronger than I did a few weeks ago. I remember getting out of the pool in the first week in January and having to steady myself on the side because my legs felt like jelly. Now, I am swimming further and pushing myself to do a little bit further than last time and I am enjoying it a lot. I have also found that it gives me time to think about things. Once I get into a rhythm, it’s like my body is on auto pilot and my brain has the freedom to think. Having time to think about things is something that I think we forget about doing these days.

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The second sport I have tried is netball. Netball isn’t so well-known in Switzerland and most of the players are expats from UK, Australia and New Zealand. I felt really welcomed by the team and it wasn’t too hard to get back into the swing of things. I was wondering if I would have forgotten how to catch a ball but it turns out that netball is like riding a bike!

I didn’t feel like I was putting much effort into all of the running around (I was playing GS after all). But when I looked at the mirrors in the toilets afterwards, I realised that I bore a striking resemblance to a boiled beetroot. I used to be embarrassed about how red my face got during sport but it is a good indicator that I have been working hard. No one can accuse me of not putting effort in to something when I have changed colour quicker than a chameleon. Having said that, I know that as I get fitter that my redness will reduce – which is also good motivation!

As the weather has improved, I even decided to go running. My knee is better and there is no reason why I shouldn’t when there is no snow and ice on the ground waiting to trip me up. Oh wait, there is a reason. An old nemesis of mine, also from my school days has decided to rear its ugly head. Asthma.

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I was diagnosed with asthma when I was a teenager. After cross country running, my classmates told me that I sounded like the laughing dog, Muttley, from The Wacky Races TV series. So, I decided it would be a good idea to get checked out because the symptoms seemed to point to asthma. I was given an inhaler to relieve the symptoms and then I sort of forgot about it.

I ran 10ks, half marathons and even a marathon and I didn’t need my medication to relieve any symptoms but they weren’t there. I thought I had managed to outgrow a childhood illness (which is completely possible). I realised last week that I was wrong. My asthma is particularly affected by cold temperatures, which is why this hadn’t become apparent when I have been swimming and playing netball inside where the temperature is warmer.

After a short run I sounded like Wheezy the Penguin from Toy Story 2 when he has lost his squeak: my chest was tight and I felt like I was suffocating. I admitted defeat, called the doctor and asked for an appointment.

Armed with my inhaler, I feel like a different person. Two runs powered by medication and I can breathe easily, I’m not wheezing and I am actually enjoying running again. If I keep going like this, I think that I will be able to hit my fitness goals for 2019. However, even if I don’t, even if my 10k personal best eludes me, I know that I am on the right track for a happier and healthier me.