Tag Archives: fireworks

Things I’ve learnt in September

1 Oct

As it is already October 1st, I am a bit late with this post but it did take me a while to come up with five things that I have learnt in September. However, here are five interesting things that I learnt last month.

1. There are only two dates in a year when you can set off fireworks in Switzerland without a permit.

It’s hardly surprising that pryotechnics, like lots of other activities in Switzerland, are regulated. It hadn’t occured to me before some mentioned it the other day. Perhaps this is a reason why people really do go crazy on 1st August and 31st December here. It sometimes feels like being in the middle of a war with the amount of fireworks being set off on these days but I guess people are just getting their money’s worth and saving on some paperwork.

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2. Son always grow to be taller than their mothers.

Obviously this is only valid when the son doesn’t have a genetic growth disorder or something similar and when the son has reached his maximum height and isn’t still growing. I am convinced that this is true. I have visually gone through virtually all of the men that I know and they are taller than their mothers. I am so obsessed by this that I am tempted to ask men when I first meet them, if they are taller then their mother just to gain some more evidence to support this theory. If you know of anyone who doesn’t fit this theory, please let me know!

3. It is possible to make a cake without any dairy products at all.

I have been dabbling with veganism recently. I found a recipe for a cake. This recipe doesn’t have any dairy products in it and didn’t have any vegan-friendly dairy substitutes. It was made with baking soda and fizzy water. I was expecting it to taste awful but actually it was great and didn’t last long.

4. There is more than one type of pumpkin.

I visited a pumpkin farm last week and I was surprised by how many varietiesĀ of pumpkin there are. I didn’t know that butternut squash was classed as a pumpkin. There were even some pumpkins there that looked like if you put it in water you would be able to recreate that grainy black and white photo of the Loch Ness Monster. I don’t know what time of year that photo was taken but if it was during pumpkin season then I would say that this was a good explanation for the hoax. Anyway, I wasn’t brave enough to buy a pumpkin that resembled a mythical, Scottish monster, so I bought a regular Halloween pumpkin and I am looking forward to cooking and eating it soon.

5. I’ve taken the summer for granted… again.

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The nights are already dark and the weather is getting colder and the list of things that I wanted to go this summer (mainly hiking and outdoor activities that I won’t be able to do when the snow finally comes). I always have a good intentions of having picnics, relaxing back the lake and swimming in the lake. I have only been swimming in the lake once this year, which is pretty pathetic by anyone’s standards. However, it was a glorious evening when I did go swimming so perhaps quality not quantity is the best way to look at it. It’s now too late to do anything about my summer to-do list… apart from roll over the things that I wanted to do this year to my Summer 2019 list.

 

 

Bonfire Night

9 Nov

Although it might be a bit late to be blogging about Bonfire Night (it was last Sunday after all), I have just finished watching the BBC Drama Gunpowder, which is a dramatisation of the events leading up to the 5th November and the plot to kill the King of England and the politicians in the House of Parliament.

After the first installment of the three part drama, the BBC was flooded with complaints about the episode, saying that it was unnecessarily gory. I was actually quite surprised that it wasn’t gory enough. One scene showed the public executions and the camera “looked away” at the really graphic parts. You did see someone having their intestines pulled out while they were still alive, but I am sure that the guts and gore was mainly made up of sausages and other things that you might find in the bin of the local butchers. I am convinced that what went on in the Jacobian era was actually a lot more horrifying.

The drama reminded me of what a rich history we have in England. Try to explain to someone from another country that in each November we gather in a field and set fire to the effigy of a Catholic from the 17th century and they will look at you in complete dismay. In Switzerland, there is the ritual burning of a snowman in April to get rid of the winter, which has a lot more positive and much less sinister message than burning someone because of their religion.

Bonfire Night is one of the traditions that I miss. Nothing is quite so British as waiting in the freezing cold for someone to set off some fireworks. All the while complaning about how much it cost to get in and that you will not be doing this again next year. As a child I remember being so cold that I couldn’t feel my fingers or my toes. I was so glad to be back in the warmth again to thaw out. By the time the next year came round we had forgot how cold a November evening could be and we were excited about going again. It’s a shame that the torch light parade that used to happen in our village stopped because of health and safety reasons. The world has gone mad.

It was Abba who said “the history book on the shelf, it’s always repeating itself”. I wonder if Guy Fawkes would have been inclined to use the same tactics today? Back then, people were complain about how the country was being run and people are still making the same complaints today. If he had have been successful all those years ago, perhaps we would have a parade in his honour and not be burning him on a pile of old wood.fireworks-2922007__340