Tag Archives: authors

40 Before 40: Challenge #29

3 Mar

Challenge #29 on my list was to read all the books on the 40 Books Every Woman Should Read. This is a list of 40 books by female authors, the majority of whom, to my shame, I am not familiar with or even heard of.

At the start of the challenge, I had already read 4 of the books on the list, mainly because we were forced to read them at school and not necessarily because I was particularly interested in reading them.

As I have got older, I tend to read only contemporary books. There are quite a few older books on the list, like Little Women and Jane Eyre. To be blunt, I wasn’t looking forward to reading these at all. It was always hard work reading them as a young adult.

For this update, I have read two of these “older” books and I have to say that I have really enjoyed them. Below are some of my comments about the books that I have read from the list.

Near to the Wild Heart by Clarice Lispector

This is one of the authors from the list that I haven’t heard of. She is actually Brazilian and the book was originally written in Portuguese. Before I started to read the book, I found out that her writing style has been compared to that of James Joyce, who made famous the stream of consciousness narrative style. In fact, the title of the book is actually a quote from Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. I enjoyed reading Joyce for my English Literature A-Level exam so I was hopeful that I would also find this book enjoyable.

The main character is Joana and the story provides flashbacks between her childhood, her adolescence and present day. It tells the story of her relationship with her husband and their divorce (which must have been scandalous to read in the 1940s) and the woman, who her husband gets pregnant. In one part of the book, Joana meets with this woman, Lidia, who she knows is having an affair with her husband. Her reaction was a bit strange as she is not particularly bothered by this.

I really enjoyed this book. Sometimes the book was hard to follow because it flipped between different times but some of the descriptions and the writing was incredible.

Little Women – Louisa May Alcott

I had this book as a child but I only managed to ever read a couple of chapters of it. It is perhaps one of the most famous books on the whole list. The story is of a group of four sisters, who are growing up during the time of the American Civil War. Their father is away working as a pastor and the four girls and their mother are left at home waiting for news about his return.

The four young women have very different characters and personalities: one is a tomboy; another very quiet and interested in art; another the mother figure of the group, when their mother is absent; one is very shy and musical.

The story tells what becomes of the sisters as they grow up, which includes marriages, deaths, births, work and extensive trips to Europe.

The BBC showed an adaptation of the book between Christmas and New Year. As it was after I had read the book, I thought it might be a good idea to watch it. Unfortunately, I just couldn’t get into it. Perhaps the characters didn’t look as I thought they would have done. I also found the American accents a bit uncomfortable. As I was reading the book, I did have the tendency to forget that the story was set in America and not in England and so it sounded a bit funny to my ears. I only got about 20 minutes into the programme and I decided to stop. I guess, in this case, the book was better than the screenplay.

Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte

I always find this book confusing. Is it Jane Eyre written by Charlotte Bronte or Charlotte Bronte written by Jane Eyre? Again I think that this was a book I had when I was younger that stayed on my book shelf unread. In the end I really enjoyed this book, so it was a shame that I had left it so long to read this book.

As many books from this era begin, Jane Eyre is an orphan, who is unwanted by her uncle’s family, who she is put into the care of. Eventually, she is sent away to a boarding school, where she is educated and thrives, but not before she watches her best friend in the world die of consumption. She goes on to be a teacher at the boarding school but, after getting a job as a governess of a child in a private house.

Jane falls in love with the Master of the house and is due to marry him until the wedding is stopped because Mr Rochester is already married. His wife is actually a lunatic who lives in the attic (all very bizarre). Jane leaves in the middle of the night because she does not want to become his mistress. Exhausted and hungry, she comes across a house where the people take pity on her and nurse her back to health. The new Master of the house gives her the job of a new governess of a school for poor children. He wants to marry her but she is still thinking about what happened to her Mr Rochester, who she still loves and always will. She goes off in search of him to see what has happened to him and… I won’t spoil the whole thing. You can read it yourself.

I liked the book because, although it was a romance, it wasn’t too over the top. I think a lot of books talk about love as it is some magical spell that transforms people suddenly, when in most cases love is a lot more dignified and isn’t necessarily know to the beholder immediately.

Also I learnt the word “lugubrious” which means looking or sounding sad or dismal. This is my new favourite word. If I was still at school, I would be desperate to get this into one of my exam scripts. I might try to get it into one of my short stories.

I have now read 7 out of the 40 books that I need to complete this challenge. I am so glad that I decided to have this one my list. I’m really enjoying it.




Writing progress

28 Feb

Finally, I have managed to finish writing, not one, but two short stories, and I have started writing a third. I think the last time I wrote one in its entirety I was still at school.

Undoubtably, going to my Writing Group on a Wednesday has really helped. Writing is a solitary pursuit and it can be very difficult to have the motivation and will to carry on, especially when you don’t feel like you are making any progress at all. Being part of the group makes me has really spurred me on to write more.

There is also a lot of hints and tips that you can glean from other writers. My problem of not being about to finished any storied was partially solved by a fellow scribe assuring me that every first draft is terrible. This gave me the confidence to just get something written and then at least I have a starting point and I can go back to it and make corrections and improve it. Lots of people in the group seem to have this problem as well so it is a bit like group therapy where we help each other through the problems together.


I am certainly feeling a bit more confident about my writing, even though I am learning and practicing as I go along. I have been attending the group since October last year and last week was the first week that I felt confident enough to read out what I had written. At the start of the session, we are given a writing prompt and we spend 15 minutes writing about it. We are then free to share what we have written but no one is forced to share if they don’t want to. It did help that there weren’t too many people at the session, so I didn’t feel so self-conscious and I was pleasantly surprised about the positive reaction.

Something that has inspired me is that someone in the group has had her debut novel published a few weeks ago. I am completely in awe and it make me realise that it is possible to write a novel and to get it published. Gabi actually quit her job to dedicate time to writing the first draft of her novel. I am nowhere near being about to do this and I know that it is possible to write whilst still having a day job. But it is interesting to hear that there are different way to become a published author – you just have to find the way that is best for you. Oh, and I didn’t tell you the bit that I am possibly most impressed about: Gabi’s novel is in English and English isn’t her native language. Serious respect.

I haven’t been able to read the whole book yet, and I will order the book so it is ready for me to read once I am back from travelling, but you can get her book here if you are interested in reading it.

And as for the stories I have written… they still need a bit of work. (Edit: a lot) Maybe I will share it once I have improved them a bit. Practice makes perfect, after all.