Archive | July, 2020

Gardening Success

20 Jul

I’m not the world’s best gardener but I have been trying to spend more time in the garden, especially as the chances of a two-week holiday this summer seemed unlikely. I took it as the perfect opportunity to invest time and energy into the garden while I’m here to enjoy it.

I’ve been surprised by my successes so far. The cherry tomatoes are coming along (a few even look like they are turning red); the snack peppers have already been ‘harvested’ once; my sweet peas are growing like the clappers, but alas! no sign of any flowers yet; and a moldy tomato I decided to plant to “see if it would grow or not” seems to grow an inch every time I look at it.

I need to replant the ‘moldy tomato plant’ because it needs more space to grow into at the rate its growing. I’ve been meaning to do that for the past five days now but I will do it tomorrow.

Here are some photos:

Lots of cherry tomatoes and the first ones turning red!
This is what happens when you plant a moldy tomato…
First ‘harvest’ of snack peppers

I would like to grow other vegetables and plant but at the moment I don’t have deep enough soil. I’m already thinking about investing in some more permanent (and deeper) plots of soil for next year!

Back to Drama

13 Jul

During the Lockdown, I busied myself with online drama course offered by an English-speaking theatre group based in Zurich. It was so much fun. I didn’t do much acting and drama when I was at school (long story that I’ll save for another time) so I’m making up for lost time and trying to learn as much about drama and the theatre as I can. I like having a hobby that is completely different to my day job but also compliments my ambitions of being a full-time writer.

Now people can meet in person again, drama classes are back and in person (while observing the 2m distancing rule as much as possible). So I signed up for an Improvisation class. It sounds like the stuff of nightmares to most people, being without a script and taking suggestion from the audience to be used in the scene, but I’d much prefer to do that than learn lines and lines from a script that I’m bound to forget anyway.

With any luck what we learn in the class will be showcased in a performance near the end of the month. The luck part is hoping that a second wave hasn’t hit and it’s still possible to perform live.

Then later in August the theatre company is hoping to bring some of the pieces that we studied and created in lockdown to the real stage, which is such a great idea. I’ve put myself forward to perform a couple of pieces so I just have to see if they are chosen to be performed on the night.

On top of that I’ve also started an online screen writing course. It’s online because playwright who is workshopping it is based in the UK so for once an online course is happening online for logistical reasons and not because of a global pandemic. I’ve never written anything before for the stage or TV apart from a short play I wrote as part of the online course that ran in April. It’s very fun to learn something new and I’m hoping it will also help me develop interesting characters to use in a future book or short story.

I am grateful, in a weird way, for the pandemic because I wouldn’t have been able to take these classes and find something I have a passion for. Obviously I hope life will return to normal as soon as possible but I would like to stick to the acting and theatre now I’ve found it.

Challenge #35 – completed

6 Jul

My aim to read 40 non-fiction books before I am 40 is over. I’ve never been a big lover of non-fiction so I decided to attempt to clear my shelves of some of the books I’ve been meaning to read but haven’t. I must say I enjoyed this challenge more than I thought I would. Here are the books I read to complete the challenge:

The Healing Self: Supercharge your immune system and stay well for life by Deepak Chopra and Rudolph E. Tanzi – I get the irony of me finishing reading this book, just as lockdown started. There were interesting anecodes in the book but I would say that there was anything majorly life changing about the book. It advocated practising meditation, eating less meat and not drinking alcohol which are fairly standard practices for people who want to improve the quality and longevity of their lives.

The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion – this book is about the author’s struggle with coming to terms with her husband’s death while dealing with her daughter’s serious illness. I found it fairly indulgent and the most interesting part for me was how she dealt with her grief rather than her feelings of obligation to her daughter. A lot of the thoughts about grief and loss were familiar to me. I wished the whole book was devoted to exploring this rather than just dipping into the subject.

Finish: Give Yourself the Gift of Done by Jon Acuff – I credit this book with being the main reason I managed to finish the first draft of my novel. It’s a great read about why people fail to tackle goals they set themselves and how to recify this. There are lots of practical examples and tips to help you achieve any goal, no matter how big or small. To read a full review, check out my writer’s website here.

How to Get What You Want in the Workplace by John Gray – this is the third book of John Gray’s I’ve read for this challenge. I like the advice he gives and how it makes you rethink about how communications between men and women differ. In some respects, this books gives very similar advice and observances to the other books I read but I still found it useful and I’m trying to incorporate the advice into situations at work, though that is difficult at the moment when I’m working from home!

Watching the English: The Hidden Rules of English Behaviour by Kate Fox – This was a very interesting and funny book. The author looked at all aspects of English life from the pub, to queuing and attitudes towards brands of cars. Parts of it were funny and parts really made me think differently about social situations and the class system in England. I would love to read more books like this.

Dare To Connect by Susan Jeffers – I’ve tried to read this book before but failed. I managed to get through it this time and loved it. (I guess before it wasn’t the right time to read it). It’s all about connect with people and how having the right connections with the right people can help you achieve happiness. A great book.

A Rebel’s Guide to Inner Peace by Mahima Lucille Klinge – part autobiographical work, part self-help book, I found this interesting. I actually received this when I went to a conference arranged by the author last year. It was interesting to read more about how she had come to be at the point in her life where she was coaching people to improve their lives and as a reminder about the things I learnt at that conference. I am grateful I went on the conference and read this book as I benefited from it greatly.

How to Work with Just About Anyone by Lucy Gill – after reading this book, I realised that I have it easy as work. All the examples given in the book seemed to involve utterly awful people. If my work colleagues were that bad I would quit my job and be done with it. There was some good advice though which, again, I will hope to use in the future… if I haven’t forgotten it all after working from home for so long.

Finding Ultra by Rich Roll – as running an Ultra marathon is also on my list of things to do before I am 40, I thought this would be a great place to find tips for me to use in my training. The author was an over-weight middle-aged man who realised his lifestyle was slowly killing him so he changed his lifestyle and fell into long distance running. He went on to complete in the world’s most grueling competitions, such as Ironman races. It’s an inspiring story and, although I doubt I will compete in Ironman’s, I have learnt a lot about training for an Ultra. I highly recommend it if you are interested in competing over longer distances.

The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch – this book had me in floods of tears at the end and I don’t care who knows it. The author wrote the book as a legacy to his young children after he was diagnose with terminal cancer. So many parts of the book struck a chord with me and the book was a reminder that although life is short, you can achieve your dreams, whatever they are.

I have now completed 22 of my 40 challenges. I’m starting to worry about completing the travel-related ones on time but I am pushing on regardless.