Archive | July, 2019

End of July

31 Jul

It only seems like five minutes ago that was sitting down to write my round-up of news at the end of June. But here we are again.

This month I haven’t been very active on the blogging front. I normally try to write at least 2 posts per week. Sorry to have taken your weekly reading away from you! I haven’t been especially busy but it is the holiday season, so I’ve used the time as a bit of a break.

Here is what I have been up to in July:

  • I started a new job on the 1st July. It was the job that I wanted more than anything when I saw the job advert and, after a delay of a few months, they finally hired me. That is putting a long story short but you hopefully get that I was so excited to join the company and get working. So far I have been impressed by the company immensely and all of my colleagues are nice. I am the only female on my team of 10 but I actually don’t mind that. Getting into a new routine, learning everything that I need to do and familarising myself with new policies and procedures has kept me busy. I can’t believe I have been there for a month already.
  • I have been busy on my commute with the latest installment of Erin’s Reading Challenge.  This is my third time taking part in the challenge. I am currently reading my 8th book which is Umberto Eco’s Foucault’s Pendulum. It’s a hefty book (600+ pages) but I am loving reading it and I hope that I will be able to finish it tomorrow.
  • I visited my 31st country in Europe when I went to Luxembourg earlier this month. I counted up last weekend how many countries I had visited and my total is now 56. That seems like a staggering amount, especially when there is so much more of the world that I would like to see. img_6723
  • In the evenings I have been busy training for the Rock n Roll 10k in Dublin in August. I’m not as fit as I should be so I know that I won’t be able to beat my personal beat time in this race but I’m on the right track. Over the next few days, I am going to decide on what time I think I can realistically achieve. I ran 10k last weekend (very slowly) and that should help with the realistic part. This month I have run a total of 50km or 31-ish miles. I have already set myself an ambitious target of how many kms I want to run in August.
  • Due to the nice weather most evenings we have had a BBQ and last night, even though the rain had started, we still sat outside under the cover of the balcony and had a BBQ. It was warm enough to sit out and the spots of rain didn’t manage to get us. We did have a shock when a bird unexpectedly nose-dived into the windows behind where I was sitting. It made an almighty crash. How it managed to regain control and fly off again I don’t know.
  • I discovered an interesting website this week. It’s called Forebears. You can look up your surname and find out how many people in the world have the same surname as you. It even analyses in which countries the name is most prevelant. I don’t know how the information is gathered but I am apparently one of 13 people with my surname living in Switzerland.
  • I also found out this month what 20kg of bread looks like. Tomorrow is Swiss National Day and I had to pick up the bread order for the festivities. I could barely fit all of it in the car. Tomorrow we ease into August with fireworks, festivities and a free day from work. I hope that your start into the new month is just as enjoyable

Weekend in Luxembourg

26 Jul

Last weekend we went to Luxembourg. I have never been before and as one of my challenges is to visit 40 countries in Europe it was time to change that. So Luxembourg is officially the 31st country that I have visited in Europe.

Luxembourg is a small country and, to be honest, there wasn’t a lot to see and do there so I was glad that we had decided to only make a weekend out of it. But the city itself is charming and very beautiful.

Here are some of the things that we did:

Free Walking Tour

If you have been reading my blog for any length of time you will know that I am a big fan of taking a free walking tour in any and every city around the world. It was good that we did this on the first day so that we could get a good grasp of the city and find our bearings. It was during the tour I realised that the city really isn’t that big at all.

We visited St Michael’s Church during the tour. Mainly because of my education, I am a bit of a church geek and I was blown away by the stained glass window in this church. I know it sounds like a strange thing to say but the windows looked so modern even thought the church was one of the oldest in the city. Of course, it could be that the church had been recently renovated but they are still the nicest windows I have ever seen in a church.

 

The Bock Casements

On the outskirts of the city are the remains of the underground tunnels from a fortress. The fortress was built to help protect the city and over the centuries the enemy had tried to raze the fortress. Only a few towers from the fortress is still standing today but 17 kilometers of the casements or the tunnel of it are left. It was fun exploring what is left of the tunnels. Some of the tunnels were very narrow and I had to make sure constantly that I didn’t hit my head on the roof.

Beer and Food

I didn’t realise how many Luxembourgish beers there are. We tried a couple of them and were impressed! I found the prices of the drinks and the food as well to be very similar to Swiss prices. It definitely didn’t turn out to be a cheap holiday in that respect.

We didn’t try any specialities from Luxembourg on the food front but we did find a very nice sushi place for lunch one day and we had a meat and cheese board for dinner on the first night which was excellent.

Skaters

It’s always interesting to see how local people entertain themselves on a Saturday night. Luxembourg did not disappoint. We walked past a stakeboard shop that was holding an event. Basically the whole road was blocked off and they were staking down the road, hitting a ramp and then jumping over a bin and landing on the other side. Just when I thought I had seen it all, one of them decided to do this naked. It took the poor guy 4 times to land the jump on the other side of the bin. By the time he landed the jump to raptuous applause he was covered head to toe (and also in between) with grazes and brusies.

I have no idea why the police weren’t called to break up the disturbance but I was glad that they didn’t. The people who had “organised” this were relatively responsible and did stop proceedings to let traffic pass safely.

 

My next travels will be to Dublin in August (but I have already been to Ireland so that won’t count towards my list of 40) and then to Belgrade, Serbia in Septemeber.

 

40 Before 40: Challenge #29 completed!

8 Jul

After more page-turning than I can remember, I am finally finished with my Challenge 29! I have now read all of the books on the list of 40 books every woman should read. Some of the books I didn’t enjoy very much but others of them I loved. I am so glad that I decided on this as one of my challenges. I will definitely be hunting down more books by the same authors in the near future.

Here are the last seven books that I read to complete the list:

The History of Love by Nicole Krauss

This book was incredible. I was grasping for breath by the end because I was reading the pages so quickly so that I could get to the end that I forgot to breathe. The characters in the book are all connected to a book called The History of Love somehow and the origins of the book is exploded by switching between the past and the present. The story isn’t long but it is so well written that I had trouble putting the book down. The ending took me by complete surprise. An incredible read!

Broken Harbour by Tana French

When I realised that this was a crime novel I was so excited about reading the book and having found another crime writer to read. I wish I hadn’t wasted my enthusiasm. I thought that the crime and what had happened was leaning towards the very obvious side and for me the pace of the story was relatively slow. It’s a long book; I read pages and pages wondering what was going to be the thrilling out come but I was left constantly disappointed. It was different to the crime novels that I normally read in that there was more description but I prefer crime stories where the description is kept to a minimum so the story has a punchier pace.

My Antonia by Willa Cather

This book was strange. It’s set in the America Midwest and the story revolves around the Shimerda family, who move to America from Bohemia, and their hardships in establishing a new life. Jim, who is the narrator of the story, falls in love with the daughter of the family, Antonia, and learns to read and takes an interest in cooking and housekeeping while becoming very popular with the locals, while he leaves to finish his education. He arrives back to find that she is married with children. It’s a sad story full of regret and missed chances. Jim realises that he never should have left Antonia behind and so does the reader.

The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand

I had looked at some reviews of this book online and I wasn’t looking forward to reading it. Firstly, it is very long (more than 700 pages) and, secondly, there were a lot of unfavourable opinions about the book. I did take me a while to get into the book. It is so descriptive that I was beginning to wonder if the online reviews were going to turn out to be right. Once I got used to the style of writing though, the story was enjoyable. The books centres around two young architects and how different their lives end up as they make different creative and lifestyle choices during their life. The book is essentially about greed and selfishness but I also think there is a message of hope that individuals can triumph over the establishment.

Cherry by Mary Kerr

This was an autobiographical work about the author’s adolescent period. The story itself was very interesting as was the style of the writing. The author used the second person singular throughout the book which is not typical for an autobiography or most other fiction books. It gave the story a very personal edge to it – it felt like I was experiencing what happened to the author at the same moment that I was reading it. Parts of the story were hysterically funny, others I could completely identify with. The book is actually a sequel to an earlier book but I don’t feel I missed out by not having read the first installment.

Random Family by Adrian Nicole LeBlanc

This book was non-fiction and retold the story of a family growing up in the Bronx in the late eighties. Most of the people ended up in jail, regularly took drugs and had problems with their family relationships. It was a long but interesting read that made me realise how privileged my upbringing was.

The Golden Notebook by Doris Lessing

I wanted to like this book so much but I can’t say that I did that much. The book is divided into different notebook that author Anna Wulf documents her life. She then tries to tie all of the stories together in a final ‘golden’ notebook. I found the structure confusing to being with and then one of the notebooks was all about communisim in the 1930s. I’m not a fan of politicial discussion in non-fiction books. Considering the book was written in the 60s, there were liberal discussions about sex and the role of women. I’m now not in a rush to read any more of Lessing’s books which I am disappointed about considering she is a Nobel Prize winner.

And that is all 40 books from the list finished and another one of my challenges is completed. I am so glad that I decided to include this on my list: I’ve read so many books from authors that I haven’t heard of before. Not all of the books have been easy to read or 100% enjoyable but the ones that I did enjoy made the whole challenge worth it.

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